Blog week 2- Too cool for school? No way!

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What do you refer to as ‘technology’? I know, as an 18 year old, I would suggest technology would be items such as ipads, laptops, and video cameras… but is that really all? The Mishra and Koehler article made me realise that technology does not just refer to the things that were created after I was born, it refers to anything artificial. For example pencils, analogue clocks and handbags were all new technology once upon a time. Wanting to look further into this theory I looked up a dictionary definition of the word ‘technology’. According to dictionary.refrence.com technology is ‘the branch of knowledge that deals with the creation and use of technical means and their interrelation with life, society, and the environment, drawing upon such subjects as industrial arts, engineering, applied science, and pure science’. This definition proves this theory is correct as well as briefly describing how technology could be used to stimulate ones education.

Not knowing how to use a certain item of technology effectively in a classroom is very similar to a mathematician not having the teaching skills to teach his very knowledgeable content in a classroom. In order for technological devices to be a positive learning device, teachers must understand how it can be used correctly. The article states that if you use the TPACK method, technology in the classroom can easily be an effective learning recourse. TPACK stands for combining technology knowledge, Pedagogical knowledge, and content knowledge to create a method used by teachers that guides them to correctly use technology in the classroom. I believe this is very important because I can think of much too many example of incorrect technology use in schools. The method will eliminate technology constraints, and will continue to transform technology into useful classroom aids.

Mishra, P. and Koehler, M. (2009). Too Cool For School? No Way! Learning and Leading with Technology. International Society for Technology in Education.

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